What is internal transformation and why does it matter to CTOs?

There have been countless examples of organisations spanning the globe who have spent millions adopting the latest tech solutions to empower workforces, and brought in additional tools to streamline processes – particularly throughout the past 18 months. However, moving beyond the pandemic and accelerating growth doesn’t always have to mean a new suite of technology options are integrated into a business’s infrastructure, nor should an enterprise always have to break the bank in order to remain relevant. Often, it’s a case of starting small and building from existing foundations to make the biggest improvements, as Ben Nicklen, chief operating officer for workplace data analytics organisation Tiger, explains
There have been countless examples of organizations spanning the globe that have spent millions adopting the latest tech solutions to empower workforces, and brought in additional tools to streamline processes, particularly throughout the past 18 months. However, moving beyond the pandemic and accelerating growth doesn’t always have to mean a new suite of technology options are integrated into a business’s infrastructure, nor should an enterprise always have to break the bank in order to remain relevant. Instead, it’s often a case of starting small and building from existing foundations to make the biggest internal transformation as Ben Nicklen, COO for workplace data analytics organization Tiger, explains.

It’s exciting when a company releases a fresh feature to answer customers’ specific pain-points and stand out in a saturated marketplace. Knowing that brands large and small are listening to their audience and acting accordingly should be something that no leader takes for granted.

After all, technology is supposed to be exciting, transformative, and enable individuals to do their jobs more effectively in the workplace. Plus, when rolled out effectively, it can cut through the noise and prove to play a pivotal role in how that organization operates on a day-to-day basis. However, does that mean it has to cost the earth or have every bell and whistle attached to it in order to improve an enterprise’s output and customer experience? Perhaps not.

In fact, many of the brands continuing to survive – and in several instances thrive – throughout a tremendously difficult climate, have often been the ones to sit back and take a moment to assess where they’re doing well and what needs to be enhanced. Those able to take stock of what’s already in place and where to best invest their time and budget have gone a long way towards securing their long-term future.

When small changes take place, big things can happen.

For example, if software implementation takes a day or two longer than it should, or payments are stalling because the in-house accountancy solution is no longer fit for purpose, little tweaks and adjustments can ensure a much smoother result, and a better experience for the end user.

The above example can apply to most enterprises too, whether they’re a fresh and disruptive start-up or an established entity that’s been succeeding for several decades. The simple fact is, there will always be a reason for companies to continuously reinvent themselves and invest time in internal transformation to drive the enduring success or failure of an enterprise.

How to implement positive change

Processes, governance, talent acquisition, and organizational change all have one thing in common: they’re driven by customers, stakeholders, and employees. When these individuals are willing to get behind development, firms place themselves in a far more advantageous position to truly understand and answer critical pain-points because they’re agile in their response.

Taking the workforce as an example here, there’s no question they make a huge difference to their organization’s future. However, to make an impact, it’s not a case of ‘innovate or die’; instead, it’s about seeing innovation as exciting rather than scary. And for an employee, that means understanding how they can help improve a company and play a key role in positive internal transformation.

And while leaders – such as chief technology officers (CTOs) – are looking ahead 12, 24, and 36 months into the future, these individuals are critical in making the necessary adjustments to keep business objectives well on track.

However, while many individuals collectively align in accelerating company growth, there might still be people within the enterprise who fear change or feel like nothing needs to be changed because ‘things are working fine.’

The key here is to find early adopters and make a point of celebrating critical successes. When peers see that something their colleague has achieved has enhanced the company in one way or another, it can spur them to embrace change and contribute to the overall internal transformation journey.

Overall, there isn’t a ‘trick’ to internal transformation or a best-practice solution because every enterprise is different. However, a good starting point is to review existing foundations, get the right people in the right roles, begin small, and encourage employees to think differently.

If there’s something to improve that’s been identified by many of the team, empowering them to work together can help to make the necessary tweaks and transform a ‘good’ service into an ‘exceptional’ offering.

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By taking a holistic view of the entire business – and where small gains can be made without huge disruptions or costly investments – modifications should always be part of the company agenda. And the good news is, it doesn’t have to happen at a million miles an hour either. Instead, focused adjustments can often deliver the biggest returns and subsequently accelerate growth that meet, and exceed, corporate aspirations.

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  • internal transformation, News, What is internal transformation and why does it matter to CTOs?

    With over two decades’ worth of technology and telephony expertise under his belt – having joined workplace data analytics firm Tiger in 1998 – Ben’s organisational excellence means he’s a crucial member of the senior leadership team, as chief operating officer. With a focus on company growth, Ben is driven by both product and internal transformation, alongside people development to ensure all company leaders are provided with vital insight that helps them to make better business-critical decisions.

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